Wednesday, August 6, 2008

How To Lose Control of Your Garden in 10 Easy Steps

1. Make a Jack-O-Lantern for Halloween
2. Compost pumpkin innards
3. Wait five months
4. Spread compost in your little garden
5. Mistake pumpkin seedlings for squash seedlings
6. Leave the pumpkin vines in after realizing your mistake
7. Fertilize the pumpkin vines
8. Water the pumpkin vines
9. Refuse to remove pumpkin vines because of baby pumpkin cuteness
10. Watch in horror as pumpkin vines take over your tiny garden
It took two pictures to capture this one. First growing amongst the peppers
Now wrapped around the birdbath and headed toward the road. That vine is at least sixteen feet long.

Opps, here is another one.

The little baby pumpkin. It gets bigger every day.
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39 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  3. repeat after me....oooollllmmmm....be one with your pumpkin!

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  4. Hi meme, for a second there I thought you were another spammer.

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  5. shooo ...fly spammer...no one cares in Star Trek world what you have to say either!
    Lordy those things are everywhere!

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  6. Wow, that is why I grew my squash in a container because I heard they can take over and spread everywhere too. But that baby pumpkin is pretty cute! :)

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  7. Wow, that's just craziness. The pumpkins ARE cute though. Are they supposed to help control weed growth at least?

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  8. Hi pg, hopefully it will be worth it.

    Hi cinj, no weed control here.

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  9. Same here at my house too. I hope they survive while I'm on vacation. I've got one pumpkin that grew onto the sidewalk and he's been stepped on a few times but keeps growing. They sure are hardy if they survive the squash bug infestation.

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  10. Hi anna, I am still not having any trouble with squash bugs (knock on wood) I think the planting confused them.

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  11. Hi Deb, I'm having a similar experience. But, I have only one vine and it is a vine of miniature pumpkins. Hopefully, it won't completely take over the whole yard. I've never had a pumpkin plant before. Cute post!

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  12. Thanks Barbee, I would love to see pictures of you mini pumpkins.

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  13. Once again you put a smile on my face. :-)
    I have yet to grow pumpkins because of how huge I know they can get despite my youngest son repeatedly asking me too. I will have to make sure he never hears about your compost or he might just sneak some pumpkin seeds into ours this Halloween!

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  14. cindy, I accidentally grew a vine a few years ago in my perennial bed. I didn't know when to pick the pumpkins and the little guys exploded. Yes, I had exploding pumpkins as well as cabbage. I compost our jack-o-lanterns every year, and have only had the volunteer vines twice.

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  15. hey Aunt Debbi! Re Southern Living 2000 cookbook, check out
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/084871993X/ref=dp_olp_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1218084829&sr=8-2
    If link doesn't work, search for SL2000 on amazon.com. There are a couple of "new" copies available in their marketplace section for about $6.
    --Curmudgeon

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  16. Thanks Curmudgeon, I will now have my long lost cook book.

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  17. That's happening to us too!

    Although looking at the leaves I think it's a spaghetti squash and not a pumpkin but only time will tell.

    I'm pretty sure certain people in charge of compost got a little lazy and threw some of it in the raised beds last November.

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  18. Like babies, they look cute when young to compel you to look after them. Next thing you know, you have a gawky teenager all over the house/garden. : )
    You should be well set for next Halloween now.

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  19. I had to giggle at this although I know it must not be funny to have your garden taken over. In fact, I know it isn't. I was just lamenting my similar circumstance with mint that I stupidly put in the garden years ago and is now the bane of my existence. Live and learn, I guess.

    Hugs,
    Cindy

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  20. Oh that's made me laugh so hard Deb :D

    I'm having a similar problem with Nasturtiums on my plot. Yes, you can eat them in salads, but a whole plotfull? AND I chopped them back and got burnt skin earlier and they just came right on back. Now I need to wear sunglasses when I go up the allotment because there's so many flowers and they're all so bright!

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  21. Tam, this mess is all on me. I would like to blame the monkeys, but can't. Good luck with your spagetti squash.

    Northern Shade, I like that. Those vines are about as ackward as my teen.

    Hi cind, mint will really take over. I have found that lemon balm is just as bad.

    vp, sounds like a pretty take over anyway:)

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  22. self-inflicted garden woes... the best kind. I'm thinking about the watermelon I chopped up the other day and threw in there... great.

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  23. Oh, how sweet! I thought about planting gourds last spring, and never got around to it. Need to do that one of these days. It will be fun to see just how big "baby pumpkin" will get!
    Brenda

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  24. Hi brenda. It seems to be doubling in size every day.

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  25. But hey, you LOVE pumpkins, don't you? ;-)

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  26. How to loose control over your neighbor's grape vine is my gripe girl ! it is on the top of my Mountain Ash tree making a home for itself !!! Yikes !!!
    Love the post .. you can't kill baby pumpkins .. they are just too CUTE : )

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  27. Sorry about the grapevine, Joy. So far everybody is still alive.

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  28. Dee/reddirtramblingsAugust 8, 2008 at 8:21 AM

    I love your baby pumpkins. It's always the cuteness that gets us isn't it? Can't wait to see them for Halloween.~~Dee

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  29. Hi dee, The cuteness leads to craziness every time. So far the big one is growing strong. Wonder how long it takes to get a mature pumpking after fruit set?

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  30. That's why I always try to trick my little sister into planting pumpkin vines and then giving me one of the pumpkins!

    Carol, May Dreams Gardens

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  31. Hi Carol, I "internet" know your little sister and her zoo. I think that would be a riot.

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  32. aw, cute pumpkins! It would be hard for me to cull any of them. I hope you get enough pumpkins for the kids and for pie. Pumpkin bread is yummy too. and muffins. and soup.

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  33. I saw something last night on TV where they said you could wrap the stem round on itself like a big coil of rope and so the plant takes up less room. You hold it in place with tent pegs

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  34. Thanks garden girl. I think I want to try pumpkin soup.

    patientgardener, thank you for the tip.

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  35. It sounds like you'll be ready for Halloween this year! I did the same thing last year only we saved most of the seeds. My wife likes them roasted. I never did that but I still have them in a jar!

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  36. Hi dave, it is good to know I am not the only one.

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  37. I wish I could complain about the vines too. Our climate does not allow tender plants like pumpkins. We tried them. Summers hot and dry, winters wet but growing temperatures are not long enough. By the way, baby pumpkins are delicious to eat. The flowers are also nice to eat but it seems a waste to me. I will wait for the baby pumpkin.

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  38. LOL! If I had a compost bin, I bet I would end up doing something like this! Did you rent space to sell all your pumpkins when Halloween rolls around?

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